U.S. Navy identifies 7 sailors who died in destroyer collision

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YOKOSUKA, Japan -- The search for seven U.S. Navy sailors missing after their destroyer collided with a container ship off Japan was called off Sunday after they were found dead in the ship's flooded compartments, CBS News national security correspondent David Martin reports, via CBS News

The U.S. Navy released the names of the deceased sailors on Sunday night.

Gunner's Mate Seaman Dakota Kyle Rigsby, 19, from Palmyra, Virginia

Yeoman 3rd Class Shingo Alexander Douglass, 25, from San Diego, California

Sonar Technician 3rd Class Ngoc T Truong Huynh, 25, from Oakville, Connecticut

Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Noe Hernandez, 26, from Weslaco, Texas

Fire Controlman 2nd Class Carlosvictor Ganzon Sibayan, 23, from Chula Vista, California

Personnel Specialist 1st Class Xavier Alec Martin, 24, from Halethorpe, Maryland

Fire Controlman 1st Class Gary Leo Rehm Jr., 37, from Elyria, Ohio
Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, the commander of the Navy's 7th Fleet, described the damage and flooding as extensive, including a big puncture under the waterline. The crew had to fight to keep the ship afloat, he said, and the ship's captain is lucky to have survived. 

"The damage was significant, this was not a small collision," he said, adding that the crew's response was "swift and effective."

"Heroic efforts prevented the flooding from catastrophically spreading which could have caused the ship to founder or sink. It could have been much worse," he said.

Navy divers found "a number of" bodies in the ship Sunday, a day after it returned to the 7th Fleet's home base in Yokosuka, Japan, with the help of tug boats. Aucoin, speaking at a news conference at the base, wouldn't say how many bodies were recovered, pending notification of next of kin. He said the remains have been transferred to Naval Hospital Yokosuka.

He said much of the crew of about 300 was asleep when the collision happened at 2:20 a.m. Saturday, and that one machinery room and two berthing areas for 116 crew members were severely damaged. 
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